Buying a home can be a big step towards securing your financial future, but saving for the down payment can be very time-consuming. However, if you already.

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I’m thinking of taking $200,000 from my 401(k) as a down payment. I’m not getting the best returns on it anyway as I’ve been retired from the company and, although diversified, still not seeing any results. I’m still working and contributing to another 401(k) and hope to have $250,000 in this when I retire.

It is probably unwise to use your retirement funds to pay for a house or even just using the 401(K) for a down payment on a house. Retirement money should be kept safe, so when you retire you will.

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It looks like I’m going to need to take money from my retirement savings to make a down payment on a house. Which is better to tap for a down payment — a 401(k), a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA?

Using a 401(k) loan for a down payment can be an attractive option, but you have to understand the significant risks involved.

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